California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

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What is conservation?

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Authors

Charles V. Moore

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(11):7-7.

Published November 01, 1983

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Conservation is often perceived simply as “using less,” but most water conservation activities affect the state of the system in three other ways: First, these activities change the time in which the resource is used: for example, a storage dam changes water flows from the time of surplus in the spring to the summer, when water is scarce and has a higher use value. Second, reducing use through more efficient irrigation makes it possible to move the water saved to another location where its value in use is higher. Third, conservation is related to quality, the concentration of existing salts in irrigation water and addition of salts from the soil. Since concentrated salts cause taste problems and shorten equipment life, users of recycled irrigation water and urban wastewater operate at a cost disadvantage in comparison with those in other areas without these problems.

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What is conservation?

Charles V. Moore
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

What is conservation?

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Charles V. Moore

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(11):7-7.

Published November 01, 1983

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Conservation is often perceived simply as “using less,” but most water conservation activities affect the state of the system in three other ways: First, these activities change the time in which the resource is used: for example, a storage dam changes water flows from the time of surplus in the spring to the summer, when water is scarce and has a higher use value. Second, reducing use through more efficient irrigation makes it possible to move the water saved to another location where its value in use is higher. Third, conservation is related to quality, the concentration of existing salts in irrigation water and addition of salts from the soil. Since concentrated salts cause taste problems and shorten equipment life, users of recycled irrigation water and urban wastewater operate at a cost disadvantage in comparison with those in other areas without these problems.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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