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Cultural control of navel orangeworm in almond orchards

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Authors

Curtis E. Engle, University of California
Martin M. Barnes, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(9):19-19.

Published September 01, 1983

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: The navel orangeworm overwinters primarily in the larval stage in mummy almonds that remain in the trees or on the ground after harvest. In the spring, moths emerge and lay eggs on the mummy nuts in the trees, and these nuts provide the principal food source of the first-generation larvae. Moths of this generation emerge to infest the current year's almond crop during the hullsplit period. Infestations may reach as high as 30 to 50 percent.

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Cultural control of navel orangeworm in almond orchards

Curtis E. Engle, Martin M. Barnes
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Cultural control of navel orangeworm in almond orchards

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Curtis E. Engle, University of California
Martin M. Barnes, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(9):19-19.

Published September 01, 1983

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: The navel orangeworm overwinters primarily in the larval stage in mummy almonds that remain in the trees or on the ground after harvest. In the spring, moths emerge and lay eggs on the mummy nuts in the trees, and these nuts provide the principal food source of the first-generation larvae. Moths of this generation emerge to infest the current year's almond crop during the hullsplit period. Infestations may reach as high as 30 to 50 percent.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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