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Temperature-based sulfur applications to control grape powdery mildew

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Authors

Mary Ann Sall, University of California
Jeanette Wrysinski, University of California
Frank J. Schick, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(7):4-5.

Published July 01, 1983

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew (Uncinula necator) has been a consistent disease problem in California vineyards for over a century. For nearly that long, elemental sulfur has been applied for its control. Agricultural bulletins dating to the 1890s describe the treatment schedule still in use today: regular applications of sulfur at 7- to 14-day intervals during the period of vine susceptibility. The interval may be adjusted for local conditions and grape variety, but no systematic method for determining the best timing has been previously presented. The past recommendations have led to under- or over-use of sulfur in years when environmental conditions are more or less favorable for epidemic spread.

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Author notes

This work was funded through the Smith-Lever Act grant, VC-IPM. The authors thank the 58 vineyard managers and their personnel who participated in research plots and field trials. Also, the authors are grateful for the assistance of UC Cooperative Extension farm advisors: James Kissler, Rudy Neja, Philip Phillips, John Foott, Harry Andris, Dick Bethel, Keith Bowers, and Don Luvisi.

Temperature-based sulfur applications to control grape powdery mildew

Mary Ann Sall, Jeanette Wrysinski, Frank J. Schick
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Temperature-based sulfur applications to control grape powdery mildew

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Mary Ann Sall, University of California
Jeanette Wrysinski, University of California
Frank J. Schick, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(7):4-5.

Published July 01, 1983

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Powdery mildew (Uncinula necator) has been a consistent disease problem in California vineyards for over a century. For nearly that long, elemental sulfur has been applied for its control. Agricultural bulletins dating to the 1890s describe the treatment schedule still in use today: regular applications of sulfur at 7- to 14-day intervals during the period of vine susceptibility. The interval may be adjusted for local conditions and grape variety, but no systematic method for determining the best timing has been previously presented. The past recommendations have led to under- or over-use of sulfur in years when environmental conditions are more or less favorable for epidemic spread.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This work was funded through the Smith-Lever Act grant, VC-IPM. The authors thank the 58 vineyard managers and their personnel who participated in research plots and field trials. Also, the authors are grateful for the assistance of UC Cooperative Extension farm advisors: James Kissler, Rudy Neja, Philip Phillips, John Foott, Harry Andris, Dick Bethel, Keith Bowers, and Don Luvisi.


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