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Doubling potential of sweet cherry cultivars

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Authors

Warren C. Micke , University of California
James A. Doyle, Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center
James T. Yeager, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(3):24-25.

Published March 01, 1983

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet cherry production in the Sacramento and southern San Joaquin valleys of California has historically been limited by excessive fruit doubling on the commonly grown cultivars. High summer temperatures at the time of flower bud differentiation are generally believed to cause double pistils to form, resulting in many double or spur (one side of the double aborted) fruit at harvest time the following year. Double and spur fruit are considered culls in commercial market channels, and they tend to be more prone to decay than normal cherries.

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Author notes

The assistance of Kay Ryugo, Department of Pomology, U.C., Davis, and Larry Bettiga, Staff Research Associate, Parlier, is gratefully acknowledged.

Doubling potential of sweet cherry cultivars

Warren C. Micke, James A. Doyle, James T. Yeager
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Doubling potential of sweet cherry cultivars

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Warren C. Micke , University of California
James A. Doyle, Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center
James T. Yeager, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 37(3):24-25.

Published March 01, 1983

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Sweet cherry production in the Sacramento and southern San Joaquin valleys of California has historically been limited by excessive fruit doubling on the commonly grown cultivars. High summer temperatures at the time of flower bud differentiation are generally believed to cause double pistils to form, resulting in many double or spur (one side of the double aborted) fruit at harvest time the following year. Double and spur fruit are considered culls in commercial market channels, and they tend to be more prone to decay than normal cherries.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The assistance of Kay Ryugo, Department of Pomology, U.C., Davis, and Larry Bettiga, Staff Research Associate, Parlier, is gratefully acknowledged.


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