California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Cultural practices

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Authors

Walter Reuther
Winston W. Jones

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(11):0-0.

Published November 01, 1982

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Since the Citrus Experiment Station began in 1907, a major concern has been development of more efficient fertilizer practices. Early experiments by CES scientists, primarily in the orchards of cooperating growers, showed that on most, but not all, California soils, citrus trees do not respond to potassium and phosphorus application. Substantial amounts of nitrogen, however, have been required annually to maintain good vigor and yield. Later (after World War I), it was found that animal and green manures could be replaced as nitrogen sources by chemical sources, which, among other advantages, were more efficiently used by the tree and became progressively cheaper per unit of nitrogen.

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Cultural practices

Walter Reuther, Winston W. Jones
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Cultural practices

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Walter Reuther
Winston W. Jones

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(11):0-0.

Published November 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Since the Citrus Experiment Station began in 1907, a major concern has been development of more efficient fertilizer practices. Early experiments by CES scientists, primarily in the orchards of cooperating growers, showed that on most, but not all, California soils, citrus trees do not respond to potassium and phosphorus application. Substantial amounts of nitrogen, however, have been required annually to maintain good vigor and yield. Later (after World War I), it was found that animal and green manures could be replaced as nitrogen sources by chemical sources, which, among other advantages, were more efficiently used by the tree and became progressively cheaper per unit of nitrogen.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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