California Agriculture
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Herbicide tolerance

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Authors

Bruce R. Thomas, U.C., Davis
David Pratt, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):33-33.

Published August 01, 1982

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Isolation of mutants tolerant or resistant to herbicides may become a valuable application of cell culture techniques. Every herbicide is restricted in use by the number of crops it damages or kills. Tolerant mutants of various plant species could broaden the usefulness of currently available herbicides. The advantages of searching for this kind of mutant using cell cultures are (1) accuracy and uniformity of herbicide exposure in culture, (2) the ease with which billions of cultured cells may be screened for ability to grow in the presence of the herbicide, and (3) the potential (as yet unrealized for most crop species) for easy isolation of recessive mutants using haploid cell cultures.

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Herbicide tolerance

Bruce R. Thomas, David Pratt
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Herbicide tolerance

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Bruce R. Thomas, U.C., Davis
David Pratt, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):33-33.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Isolation of mutants tolerant or resistant to herbicides may become a valuable application of cell culture techniques. Every herbicide is restricted in use by the number of crops it damages or kills. Tolerant mutants of various plant species could broaden the usefulness of currently available herbicides. The advantages of searching for this kind of mutant using cell cultures are (1) accuracy and uniformity of herbicide exposure in culture, (2) the ease with which billions of cultured cells may be screened for ability to grow in the presence of the herbicide, and (3) the potential (as yet unrealized for most crop species) for easy isolation of recessive mutants using haploid cell cultures.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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