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Isozymes in plant breeding

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Authors

Charles M. Rick, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):28-28.

Published August 01, 1982

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Isozymes are multiple molecular forms of an enzyme derived from a tissue of an organism. They are usually separated when an electric charge causes their migration through a gel, and they are visualized when the gel is placed in a solution of the proper substrate for the enzyme and the end product of the reaction is stained. This procedure results in discrete bands, whose positions in the gel are determined by the charge and molecular weight of the isozymes. The preparation is usually a simple extract, sometimes just the unmodified juice obtained by crushing the plant sample.

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Isozymes in plant breeding

Charles M. Rick
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Isozymes in plant breeding

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Charles M. Rick, U.C., Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):28-28.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Isozymes are multiple molecular forms of an enzyme derived from a tissue of an organism. They are usually separated when an electric charge causes their migration through a gel, and they are visualized when the gel is placed in a solution of the proper substrate for the enzyme and the end product of the reaction is stained. This procedure results in discrete bands, whose positions in the gel are determined by the charge and molecular weight of the isozymes. The preparation is usually a simple extract, sometimes just the unmodified juice obtained by crushing the plant sample.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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