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Hybridization in strawberries

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Authors

Royce S. Bringhurst, U.C., Davis
Victor Voth, Pomologist

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):25-25.

Published August 01, 1982

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Polyploidy is important in strawberries, because only in the end products found in nature (octoploids Fragaria chiloensis and F virginiana) were the necessary genes found, organized, and conserved in such a way as to make possible the relatively rapid breeding of the modern large-fruited strawberry cultivare. Lower ploidy levels are of interest, because they tend to be highly specialized to specific environments, and many of the traits they carry as a result may be useful in the cultivare of the future, if they can be introduced into the octoploids.

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Hybridization in strawberries

Royce S. Bringhurst, Victor Voth
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Hybridization in strawberries

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Royce S. Bringhurst, U.C., Davis
Victor Voth, Pomologist

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):25-25.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Polyploidy is important in strawberries, because only in the end products found in nature (octoploids Fragaria chiloensis and F virginiana) were the necessary genes found, organized, and conserved in such a way as to make possible the relatively rapid breeding of the modern large-fruited strawberry cultivare. Lower ploidy levels are of interest, because they tend to be highly specialized to specific environments, and many of the traits they carry as a result may be useful in the cultivare of the future, if they can be introduced into the octoploids.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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