California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Protoplast regeneration

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Authors

Dean E. Engler, U.C., Davis.
Raymond G. Grogan, U.C., Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):18-19.

Published August 01, 1982

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Plant cells without walls (protoplasts) can be isolated from leaves by a process of enzy-matically digesting away the middle lamellae between cells and the cell walls. Tremendously large numbers of protoplasts can be isolated from a single leaf; yields are typically two to four million protoplasts per gram of leaf tissue. Development of techniques and procedures causing isolated protoplasts to reform their walls, proliferate, and regenerate into whole plants is essential for the utilization of the new genetic technology.

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Protoplast regeneration

Dean E. Engler, Raymond G. Grogan
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Protoplast regeneration

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Dean E. Engler, U.C., Davis.
Raymond G. Grogan, U.C., Davis.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):18-19.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Plant cells without walls (protoplasts) can be isolated from leaves by a process of enzy-matically digesting away the middle lamellae between cells and the cell walls. Tremendously large numbers of protoplasts can be isolated from a single leaf; yields are typically two to four million protoplasts per gram of leaf tissue. Development of techniques and procedures causing isolated protoplasts to reform their walls, proliferate, and regenerate into whole plants is essential for the utilization of the new genetic technology.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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