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DNA plant viruses

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Authors

Robert J. Shepherd, U.C., Davis
Stephen D. Daubert, U.C., Davis
Richard C. Gardner, Calgene, Inc.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):16-16.

Published August 01, 1982

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: A remarkably simple genetic system for study of DNA multiplication and gene expression in plants is provided by DNA plant viruses. These viruses have only a half-dozen or so genes that are believed to be regulated in the same way as other plant genes. The DNA replicates in nuclei and may be associated with nuclear proteins (histones) in the same way as plant genetic material. Thus, the virus provides a small-scale, readily manipulated model for gene expression.

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DNA plant viruses

Robert J. Shepherd, Stephen D. Daubert, Richard C. Gardner
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

DNA plant viruses

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robert J. Shepherd, U.C., Davis
Stephen D. Daubert, U.C., Davis
Richard C. Gardner, Calgene, Inc.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):16-16.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: A remarkably simple genetic system for study of DNA multiplication and gene expression in plants is provided by DNA plant viruses. These viruses have only a half-dozen or so genes that are believed to be regulated in the same way as other plant genes. The DNA replicates in nuclei and may be associated with nuclear proteins (histones) in the same way as plant genetic material. Thus, the virus provides a small-scale, readily manipulated model for gene expression.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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