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Maize anaerobic genes

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Authors

Michael Freeling , U.C., Berkeley

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):10-12.

Published August 01, 1982

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: A higher plant has between one and ten million genes, each of which holds information that specifies the structure of a product RNA and, often, a protein. In addition, each has nucleotide sequences involved in recognizing on-off signals. Using recombinant DNA technology, pieces of DNA carrying one or a few genes can now be removed from practically any organism, replicated in microorganisms, and then studied at the level of nucleotide sequence and sequence arrangement. A few genes from higher plants are now being analyzed at this level, and alcohol dehy-drogenase-1 (Adhl) in maize, the gene studied most intensively in my laboratory, is one of them.

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Maize anaerobic genes

Michael Freeling
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Maize anaerobic genes

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Michael Freeling , U.C., Berkeley

Publication Information

California Agriculture 36(8):10-12.

Published August 01, 1982

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: A higher plant has between one and ten million genes, each of which holds information that specifies the structure of a product RNA and, often, a protein. In addition, each has nucleotide sequences involved in recognizing on-off signals. Using recombinant DNA technology, pieces of DNA carrying one or a few genes can now be removed from practically any organism, replicated in microorganisms, and then studied at the level of nucleotide sequence and sequence arrangement. A few genes from higher plants are now being analyzed at this level, and alcohol dehy-drogenase-1 (Adhl) in maize, the gene studied most intensively in my laboratory, is one of them.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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