California Agriculture
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California Agriculture
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Technology has improved wine quality

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Authors

A. Dinsmoor Webb, Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(7):6-8.

Published July 01, 1980

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Quality in any wine is a function of the potential quality in the grape and the skill of the enologist in converting that grape to wine. The first control of ultimate wine quality starts with analyses of the grapes in the vineyard, where two attributes are of primary importance. To be palatably balanced—that is, not thin or overly alcoholic—the wine must be made from grapes containing the appropriate concentration of natural sugars. Too little sugar results in watery, thin, and unpalatable wines. Too much alcohol results from grapes left on the vine until they are overripe; these wines, perhaps suitable as dessert accompaniments, are simply too alcoholic to be used with meals.

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Technology has improved wine quality

A. Dinsmoor Webb
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Technology has improved wine quality

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

A. Dinsmoor Webb, Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(7):6-8.

Published July 01, 1980

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Quality in any wine is a function of the potential quality in the grape and the skill of the enologist in converting that grape to wine. The first control of ultimate wine quality starts with analyses of the grapes in the vineyard, where two attributes are of primary importance. To be palatably balanced—that is, not thin or overly alcoholic—the wine must be made from grapes containing the appropriate concentration of natural sugars. Too little sugar results in watery, thin, and unpalatable wines. Too much alcohol results from grapes left on the vine until they are overripe; these wines, perhaps suitable as dessert accompaniments, are simply too alcoholic to be used with meals.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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