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Chemical control: Conventional and nonconventional chemicals for mosquito control

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Authors

Charles H. Schaefer, University of California, stationed at the Fresno Mosquito Control Research Laboratory, 5544 Air Terminal Drive, Fresno, CA 93727
Mir S. Mulla, Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(3):28-29.

Published March 01, 1980

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Abstract

Although they have fallen into disfavor because of mosquito resistance and other problems, chemicals are still the fastest and most effective way to suppress mosquitoes. The thrust of nearly all University research in this area is on the development and evaluation of narrow spectrum insecticides that selectively kill mosquitoes with minimal injury to natural enemies and nontarget species. Promising new developments include insect growth regulators, which interfere with the growth processes of the mosquito larvae, juvenile hormones, mosquito attractants, repellents, and other substances derived from natural products.Despite problems, chemicals are still the fastest and most effective means of mosquit control. University scientists are working on narrow-spectrum insecticides that kill mosquitoes but don't harm other species.

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Chemical control: Conventional and nonconventional chemicals for mosquito control

Charles H. Schaefer, Mir S. Mulla
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Chemical control: Conventional and nonconventional chemicals for mosquito control

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Charles H. Schaefer, University of California, stationed at the Fresno Mosquito Control Research Laboratory, 5544 Air Terminal Drive, Fresno, CA 93727
Mir S. Mulla, Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside

Publication Information

California Agriculture 34(3):28-29.

Published March 01, 1980

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Although they have fallen into disfavor because of mosquito resistance and other problems, chemicals are still the fastest and most effective way to suppress mosquitoes. The thrust of nearly all University research in this area is on the development and evaluation of narrow spectrum insecticides that selectively kill mosquitoes with minimal injury to natural enemies and nontarget species. Promising new developments include insect growth regulators, which interfere with the growth processes of the mosquito larvae, juvenile hormones, mosquito attractants, repellents, and other substances derived from natural products.Despite problems, chemicals are still the fastest and most effective means of mosquit control. University scientists are working on narrow-spectrum insecticides that kill mosquitoes but don't harm other species.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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