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Some forces affecting our changing American agriculture

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Authors

Harold O. Carter , UC Davis
Warren E. Johnston, UC Davis
Carole Frank Nuckton, UC Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 33(1):9-10.

Published January 01, 1979

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Abstract

The changing interface between commercial agriculture and quasi-agricultural interests in rural areas and the rising capital requirements in farming suggest an emerging compromise in the form of a dual rural economy: (1) large commercial farm units, and (2) smaller farms, based on subsistence, part-time, retirement, or hobby interests.

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Author notes

This article is based on an address, by Harold O. Carter and Warren E. Johnston, delivered at the annual meeting of the American Association of Agricultural Economists, Virginia Potytechnique Institute, Blackburg, Virginia, August 7, 1978. The complete text appears in the December issue of The American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

Some forces affecting our changing American agriculture

Harold O. Carter, Warren E. Johnston, Carole Frank Nuckton
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Some forces affecting our changing American agriculture

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Harold O. Carter , UC Davis
Warren E. Johnston, UC Davis
Carole Frank Nuckton, UC Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 33(1):9-10.

Published January 01, 1979

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

The changing interface between commercial agriculture and quasi-agricultural interests in rural areas and the rising capital requirements in farming suggest an emerging compromise in the form of a dual rural economy: (1) large commercial farm units, and (2) smaller farms, based on subsistence, part-time, retirement, or hobby interests.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This article is based on an address, by Harold O. Carter and Warren E. Johnston, delivered at the annual meeting of the American Association of Agricultural Economists, Virginia Potytechnique Institute, Blackburg, Virginia, August 7, 1978. The complete text appears in the December issue of The American Journal of Agricultural Economics.


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