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Spider mite predator tested for pesticide resistance on pears

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Authors

Marjorie A. Hoy, Entomology, U. G, Berkeley.
Richard T. Roush, Entomology, U. G, Berkeley.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 32(8):11-11.

Published August 01, 1978

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Abstract

Under field conditions the spider mite predator M. occidentalis can resist low application rates of organophosphate pesticides; but the spider mite is 40 times more resistant to permethrin than its predator.Under lab conditions the spider mite predator, M. occidentalis, was found to be resistant to recommended concentrations of organophosphate compounds, but suffered high mortality rates when exposed to synthetic pyrethroids.

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Author notes

Support for this project. was received from California Pear Zone. Technical assistance was ably pro vided by Cynthea Nawalinski. Farm Advisors Johannes Joos, Richard Bethell and James Detar provided assistance. Helmut Riedl and William Barnett also helped locate predator colonies. Thanks to Clarence Davis and James Beutel for their assistance.

Spider mite predator tested for pesticide resistance on pears

Marjorie A. Hoy, Richard T. Roush
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Spider mite predator tested for pesticide resistance on pears

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Marjorie A. Hoy, Entomology, U. G, Berkeley.
Richard T. Roush, Entomology, U. G, Berkeley.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 32(8):11-11.

Published August 01, 1978

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Under field conditions the spider mite predator M. occidentalis can resist low application rates of organophosphate pesticides; but the spider mite is 40 times more resistant to permethrin than its predator.Under lab conditions the spider mite predator, M. occidentalis, was found to be resistant to recommended concentrations of organophosphate compounds, but suffered high mortality rates when exposed to synthetic pyrethroids.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Support for this project. was received from California Pear Zone. Technical assistance was ably pro vided by Cynthea Nawalinski. Farm Advisors Johannes Joos, Richard Bethell and James Detar provided assistance. Helmut Riedl and William Barnett also helped locate predator colonies. Thanks to Clarence Davis and James Beutel for their assistance.


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