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California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Introduction of disease and insect resistance in cultivated grapes

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Authors

Harold P. Olmo , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):24-25.

Published September 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nearly all cultivated grape varieties, of which several thousand are grown commercially, derive their excellence in fruit quality from the Vitis vinifera grape. Although long considered a single species native to the temperate zone of Middle Asia, the vinifera is more of a complex of several ecospecies. Outlying relict populations also exist in some of the principal river basins of the Mediterranean area, and of the Rhine, Mostar, and Danube valleys. However, the role of these populations in the origin of cultivated forms is questionable.

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Introduction of disease and insect resistance in cultivated grapes

Harold P. Olmo
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Introduction of disease and insect resistance in cultivated grapes

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Harold P. Olmo , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):24-25.

Published September 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Nearly all cultivated grape varieties, of which several thousand are grown commercially, derive their excellence in fruit quality from the Vitis vinifera grape. Although long considered a single species native to the temperate zone of Middle Asia, the vinifera is more of a complex of several ecospecies. Outlying relict populations also exist in some of the principal river basins of the Mediterranean area, and of the Rhine, Mostar, and Danube valleys. However, the role of these populations in the origin of cultivated forms is questionable.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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