California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Greenhouse gerberas

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Authors

Thomas G. Byrne, University of California
James A. Harding, University of California
Robert L. Nelson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):21-22.

Published September 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cut flowers are a sizeable commodity in California. Last year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Crop Reporting Board, the three major greenhouse species alone—carnations, chrysanthemums, and roses—were valued in excess of $83 million at the nursery. In addition, about 50 other species, including field-grown, accounted for perhaps another $50 million. It appears that most of these flowers were initially selected for commercial culture for reasons other than flower productivity.

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Greenhouse gerberas

Thomas G. Byrne, James A. Harding, Robert L. Nelson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Greenhouse gerberas

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Thomas G. Byrne, University of California
James A. Harding, University of California
Robert L. Nelson, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):21-22.

Published September 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Cut flowers are a sizeable commodity in California. Last year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Crop Reporting Board, the three major greenhouse species alone—carnations, chrysanthemums, and roses—were valued in excess of $83 million at the nursery. In addition, about 50 other species, including field-grown, accounted for perhaps another $50 million. It appears that most of these flowers were initially selected for commercial culture for reasons other than flower productivity.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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