California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Safflower germplasm: Domesticated and wild

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Authors

Paulden F. Knowles, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):12-13.

Published September 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the first half of this century safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) was grown for oil over a wide area of south central India and, to a limited extent, in western Turkey and Upper Egypt. It was grown on a very small scale for the flowers which served as a source of dye to color foods (the poor mans saffron) over a much wider area of the Middle East. Culture for the flowers was disappearing and, under U.S. assistance programs, introduced safflower germplasm was, in some cases, replacing local types. Fortunately collections of local types began in 1958, before it was too late. There are now about 1,500 entries in the safflower collection of the US. Department of Agriculture.

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Safflower germplasm: Domesticated and wild

Paulden F. Knowles
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Safflower germplasm: Domesticated and wild

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Paulden F. Knowles, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):12-13.

Published September 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In the first half of this century safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) was grown for oil over a wide area of south central India and, to a limited extent, in western Turkey and Upper Egypt. It was grown on a very small scale for the flowers which served as a source of dye to color foods (the poor mans saffron) over a much wider area of the Middle East. Culture for the flowers was disappearing and, under U.S. assistance programs, introduced safflower germplasm was, in some cases, replacing local types. Fortunately collections of local types began in 1958, before it was too late. There are now about 1,500 entries in the safflower collection of the US. Department of Agriculture.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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