California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Garden peppers

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Authors

Paul G. Smith, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):11-11.

Published September 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The pungent-red pepper was one of the first plants seen by Columbus on his urival in the New World—a new spice which is now grown in the tropics and subtropics around the world. Imagine the surprise and distress on Columbus' face when he bit into the fruit which was “…violently strong and growing on a shrub no bigger than a goosberry bush.” He had found a plant which had long been used by native peoples of the New World and which was cultivated from northern Mexico to southern South Amaria. The quantities of these pungent fruits consumed by the Indians was unbelievable to the Europeans. Many kind had specific uses and certain varieties were so esteemed that they were reserved for the exclusive use of the ruling classes.

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Garden peppers

Paul G. Smith
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Garden peppers

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Paul G. Smith, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(9):11-11.

Published September 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The pungent-red pepper was one of the first plants seen by Columbus on his urival in the New World—a new spice which is now grown in the tropics and subtropics around the world. Imagine the surprise and distress on Columbus' face when he bit into the fruit which was “…violently strong and growing on a shrub no bigger than a goosberry bush.” He had found a plant which had long been used by native peoples of the New World and which was cultivated from northern Mexico to southern South Amaria. The quantities of these pungent fruits consumed by the Indians was unbelievable to the Europeans. Many kind had specific uses and certain varieties were so esteemed that they were reserved for the exclusive use of the ruling classes.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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