California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Wheat and barley response to nitrogen

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Authors

Y. Paul Puri
Kenneth G. Baghott
John D. Prato

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(8):10-11.

Published August 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wheat and barley are important crops to the Tulelake Basin and other intermountain valleys of northern California. Both bread wheats and durum wheats are grown. Barley is used for malting and as a feed grain. The yields of barley and wheat vary widely from field to field and from year to year, ranging from 2000 to 7000 pounds per acre. These fluctuations are attributed to climatic and soil factors, and to the cultural practices followed.

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Wheat and barley response to nitrogen

Y. Paul Puri, Kenneth G. Baghott, John D. Prato
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Wheat and barley response to nitrogen

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Y. Paul Puri
Kenneth G. Baghott
John D. Prato

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(8):10-11.

Published August 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Wheat and barley are important crops to the Tulelake Basin and other intermountain valleys of northern California. Both bread wheats and durum wheats are grown. Barley is used for malting and as a feed grain. The yields of barley and wheat vary widely from field to field and from year to year, ranging from 2000 to 7000 pounds per acre. These fluctuations are attributed to climatic and soil factors, and to the cultural practices followed.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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