California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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High density orchards facilitate harvest

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Authors

Robert B. Fridley, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(7):12-13.

Published July 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Decisions regarding high, medium, or low density orchards must include consideration of present and future mechanization. Tree size, shape, spacing, and pruning methods in established orchards limit the selection of new methods for performing cultural and harvest operations. Every effort should be made to plant and train new orchards so as to make them as adaptable as possible to new technology but also suited to present methods. Many tree crops will be harvested by hand labor for some time; yet we cannot afford to invest in new plantings without considering mechanization. The wisest plan is to consider hand operations now and mechanized operations in the future.

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High density orchards facilitate harvest

Robert B. Fridley
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

High density orchards facilitate harvest

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robert B. Fridley, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(7):12-13.

Published July 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Decisions regarding high, medium, or low density orchards must include consideration of present and future mechanization. Tree size, shape, spacing, and pruning methods in established orchards limit the selection of new methods for performing cultural and harvest operations. Every effort should be made to plant and train new orchards so as to make them as adaptable as possible to new technology but also suited to present methods. Many tree crops will be harvested by hand labor for some time; yet we cannot afford to invest in new plantings without considering mechanization. The wisest plan is to consider hand operations now and mechanized operations in the future.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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