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Irrigation trial with morro bay wastewater

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Authors

William E. Wildman
Roy L. Branson
John M. Rible
Wilfred E. Cawelti

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):36-37.

Published May 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The coastal community of Morro Bay, like many other cities in California, is upgrading its sewage treatment plant. As elsewhere, these plant improvements are financed to a large extent with federal and state funds, and a string is attached: Consideration must be given to possible reuse of the treated wastewater or effluent. Morro Bay now disposes of its effluent into the ocean but has the possible alternative of beneficial reuse by piping it inland 1 to 5 miles for irrigation of field and forage crops, under conditions that meet Public Health Department regulations.

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Author notes

The authors are with U.C. Cooperative Extension.

Irrigation trial with morro bay wastewater

William E. Wildman, Roy L. Branson, John M. Rible, Wilfred E. Cawelti
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Irrigation trial with morro bay wastewater

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

William E. Wildman
Roy L. Branson
John M. Rible
Wilfred E. Cawelti

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):36-37.

Published May 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The coastal community of Morro Bay, like many other cities in California, is upgrading its sewage treatment plant. As elsewhere, these plant improvements are financed to a large extent with federal and state funds, and a string is attached: Consideration must be given to possible reuse of the treated wastewater or effluent. Morro Bay now disposes of its effluent into the ocean but has the possible alternative of beneficial reuse by piping it inland 1 to 5 miles for irrigation of field and forage crops, under conditions that meet Public Health Department regulations.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The authors are with U.C. Cooperative Extension.


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