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Water quality requirements for floricultural operations

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Authors

Peter J. Lert
Thomas G. Byrne

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):33-33.

Published May 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Compared to most food crops, floricultural and ornamental greenhouse crops use large amounts of irrigation water per square foot of production area. This is because of shallow soils in containers and raised beds and because of high leaching requirements when nutrient solutions are added. As a result of the large amounts of water generally being leached and its high nutrient content when fertilizers are injected into the irrigation stream, there is increasing pressure to (1) conserve water in greenhouse operations and (2) avoid contamination of surface- and ground-water supplies by reusing nutrient solutions and runoff water that might otherwise move off the premises.

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Water quality requirements for floricultural operations

Peter J. Lert, Thomas G. Byrne
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Water quality requirements for floricultural operations

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Peter J. Lert
Thomas G. Byrne

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):33-33.

Published May 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Compared to most food crops, floricultural and ornamental greenhouse crops use large amounts of irrigation water per square foot of production area. This is because of shallow soils in containers and raised beds and because of high leaching requirements when nutrient solutions are added. As a result of the large amounts of water generally being leached and its high nutrient content when fertilizers are injected into the irrigation stream, there is increasing pressure to (1) conserve water in greenhouse operations and (2) avoid contamination of surface- and ground-water supplies by reusing nutrient solutions and runoff water that might otherwise move off the premises.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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