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Vineyard irrigation in the Salinas Valley

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Authors

Rudy A. Neja
William E. Wildman, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):20-21.

Published May 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Salinas Valley shows promise of becoming a distinctive new region for growing premium wine grapes. To make the most of the cool and windy climate, however, particular irrigation management practices are required. Irrigation itself is a necessity, because annual rainfall is much lower than in the nonirrigated vineyard areas north of the San Francisco Bay, and because root depths are characteristically shallow—most of the vineyards are on old terrace soils with shallow restricting layers in the form of clay pans or abrupt stratified zones. In previous tests, we have shown that nonirrigated or minimally irrigated grapes on shallow soils in Salinas Valley are very deficient in both yield and quality compared to carefully irrigated vines.

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Vineyard irrigation in the Salinas Valley

Rudy A. Neja, William E. Wildman
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Vineyard irrigation in the Salinas Valley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Rudy A. Neja
William E. Wildman, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(5):20-21.

Published May 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: The Salinas Valley shows promise of becoming a distinctive new region for growing premium wine grapes. To make the most of the cool and windy climate, however, particular irrigation management practices are required. Irrigation itself is a necessity, because annual rainfall is much lower than in the nonirrigated vineyard areas north of the San Francisco Bay, and because root depths are characteristically shallow—most of the vineyards are on old terrace soils with shallow restricting layers in the form of clay pans or abrupt stratified zones. In previous tests, we have shown that nonirrigated or minimally irrigated grapes on shallow soils in Salinas Valley are very deficient in both yield and quality compared to carefully irrigated vines.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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