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Glandless acala cotton: More susceptible to insects

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Authors

John H. Benedict, University of California
Thomas F. Leigh, University of California
Ward Tingey, Cornell University
Angus H. Hyer, USDA Cotton Research Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(4):14-15.

Published April 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Commercially grown Acala cottons (Gossypium hirsutum L.), like most other species of the genus Gossypium, have evolved an effective chemical resistance that deters most plant-feeding animals. The biologically toxic component is a group of related, secondary plant metabolites known as terpenoids. Gossypol, the best known of these terpenoids, is a polyphenolic yellow pigment closely associated with the epidermal glands present on all aerial plant parts as well as in the cottonseed. Most commercial cottonseed contains about 1 percent gossypol, depending on variety and environmental conditions. Expensive chemical and physical procedures are used to remove gossypol from cottonseed products destined for use as food for non-ruminant animals.

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Glandless acala cotton: More susceptible to insects

John H. Benedict, Thomas F. Leigh, Ward Tingey, Angus H. Hyer
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Glandless acala cotton: More susceptible to insects

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

John H. Benedict, University of California
Thomas F. Leigh, University of California
Ward Tingey, Cornell University
Angus H. Hyer, USDA Cotton Research Station

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(4):14-15.

Published April 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Commercially grown Acala cottons (Gossypium hirsutum L.), like most other species of the genus Gossypium, have evolved an effective chemical resistance that deters most plant-feeding animals. The biologically toxic component is a group of related, secondary plant metabolites known as terpenoids. Gossypol, the best known of these terpenoids, is a polyphenolic yellow pigment closely associated with the epidermal glands present on all aerial plant parts as well as in the cottonseed. Most commercial cottonseed contains about 1 percent gossypol, depending on variety and environmental conditions. Expensive chemical and physical procedures are used to remove gossypol from cottonseed products destined for use as food for non-ruminant animals.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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