California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Rose virus and virus-like diseases

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Authors

Gary A. Secor, University of California
Mansun Kong, University of California
George Nyland, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(3):4-7.

Published March 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Like all vegetatively propagated plants, roses are subject to infection by virus and virus-like diseases that spread during propagating operations. Studies by plant pathologists with the California Department of Food and Agriculture have shown a 14 percent loss in salable blooms of virus-diseased greenhouse roses. Similar losses occur in landscape roses. Diseased plants tend to be less vigorous and less likely to survive than healthy plants, and diseases often detract from the aesthetic quality of the plant.

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Rose virus and virus-like diseases

Gary A. Secor, Mansun Kong, George Nyland
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Rose virus and virus-like diseases

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Gary A. Secor, University of California
Mansun Kong, University of California
George Nyland, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(3):4-7.

Published March 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Like all vegetatively propagated plants, roses are subject to infection by virus and virus-like diseases that spread during propagating operations. Studies by plant pathologists with the California Department of Food and Agriculture have shown a 14 percent loss in salable blooms of virus-diseased greenhouse roses. Similar losses occur in landscape roses. Diseased plants tend to be less vigorous and less likely to survive than healthy plants, and diseases often detract from the aesthetic quality of the plant.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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