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Egg traps monitor navel orangeworm

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Authors

Richard Rice , University of California
Lee L. Sadler, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(3):21-22.

Published March 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing losses to the navel orange-worm, Paramyelois transitella (Walker), have led to a multi-disciplinary research program to find better methods of controlling this primary pest of almonds in California. One result of this research was the development of a new method for monitoring navel orangeworm (NOW) moth activity. The device used-an “egg trap”—enables growers, field men, and researchers to monitor female moth flights and egg-laying (oviposition) activity directly, rather than monitoring the flight of male moths, as when using sex pheromone traps.

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Author notes

This research was supported by a grant from the California Almond Board. The cooperation of Clarence Downing and Clyde Perdue, and of L.D. Properties, Caruthers, California, is gratefully acknowledged.

Egg traps monitor navel orangeworm

Richard Rice, Lee L. Sadler
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Egg traps monitor navel orangeworm

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Richard Rice , University of California
Lee L. Sadler, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(3):21-22.

Published March 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Increasing losses to the navel orange-worm, Paramyelois transitella (Walker), have led to a multi-disciplinary research program to find better methods of controlling this primary pest of almonds in California. One result of this research was the development of a new method for monitoring navel orangeworm (NOW) moth activity. The device used-an “egg trap”—enables growers, field men, and researchers to monitor female moth flights and egg-laying (oviposition) activity directly, rather than monitoring the flight of male moths, as when using sex pheromone traps.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This research was supported by a grant from the California Almond Board. The cooperation of Clarence Downing and Clyde Perdue, and of L.D. Properties, Caruthers, California, is gratefully acknowledged.


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