California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Weed control in processing tomatoes

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Authors

Arthur H. Lange
Warren E. Bendixen
Royce Goertzen
Bill B. Fischer
Harold M. Kempen
Harry S. Agamalian
Eugene E. Stevenson
Robert A. Brendler
Jack P. Orr
Robert J. Mullen
Floyd M. Ashton, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(2):14-15.

Published February 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: High yields in processing tomatoes depend on a great many factors, not the least of which is good weed control. Weeds compete severely with the tomato, primarily for water and light, and interfere with mechanical harvest. The arsenal of herbicides available for annual weed control in tomatoes is relatively large compared to those for other vegetable crops. However, because tomatoes are planted over a large range of soil types and weather conditions, it is difficult to make accurate general recommendations.

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Weed control in processing tomatoes

Arthur H. Lange, Warren E. Bendixen, Royce Goertzen, Bill B. Fischer, Harold M. Kempen, Harry S. Agamalian, Eugene E. Stevenson, Robert A. Brendler, Jack P. Orr, Robert J. Mullen, Floyd M. Ashton
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Weed control in processing tomatoes

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Arthur H. Lange
Warren E. Bendixen
Royce Goertzen
Bill B. Fischer
Harold M. Kempen
Harry S. Agamalian
Eugene E. Stevenson
Robert A. Brendler
Jack P. Orr
Robert J. Mullen
Floyd M. Ashton, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(2):14-15.

Published February 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: High yields in processing tomatoes depend on a great many factors, not the least of which is good weed control. Weeds compete severely with the tomato, primarily for water and light, and interfere with mechanical harvest. The arsenal of herbicides available for annual weed control in tomatoes is relatively large compared to those for other vegetable crops. However, because tomatoes are planted over a large range of soil types and weather conditions, it is difficult to make accurate general recommendations.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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