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Antibiotic studies help feedlot calves

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Authors

Donald G. Addis
Gary A. Beall, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(2):10-11.

Published February 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Depending on the particular shipment, 25 to 90 percent of the feeder and stocker cattle coming into southern California desert feedlots get sick. Death losses and culling rates range from 6 to 8 percent among the lighter calves (250 to 400 pounds) and from ½ to 2½ percent for larger animals.

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Author notes

Members of the U. C. Stress Calf Study Group are Donald G. Addis; Glen P. Lofgreen, Professor of Animal Science, Imperial Valley Feed Station; Joseph G. Clark, D.V.M., Brawley; John R. Dunbar, Animal Scientist, U. C. Cooperative Extension, Davis; Carol L. Adams, Senior Statistician, U. C. Cooperative Extension, Riverside; Edward C. Prigge, Jr., Farm Advisor, Imperial County; and Ben B. Norman, Veterinarian, U. C. Cooperative Extension, Davis.

Antibiotic studies help feedlot calves

Donald G. Addis, Gary A. Beall
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Antibiotic studies help feedlot calves

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Donald G. Addis
Gary A. Beall, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(2):10-11.

Published February 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Depending on the particular shipment, 25 to 90 percent of the feeder and stocker cattle coming into southern California desert feedlots get sick. Death losses and culling rates range from 6 to 8 percent among the lighter calves (250 to 400 pounds) and from ½ to 2½ percent for larger animals.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Members of the U. C. Stress Calf Study Group are Donald G. Addis; Glen P. Lofgreen, Professor of Animal Science, Imperial Valley Feed Station; Joseph G. Clark, D.V.M., Brawley; John R. Dunbar, Animal Scientist, U. C. Cooperative Extension, Davis; Carol L. Adams, Senior Statistician, U. C. Cooperative Extension, Riverside; Edward C. Prigge, Jr., Farm Advisor, Imperial County; and Ben B. Norman, Veterinarian, U. C. Cooperative Extension, Davis.


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