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Laundering methods affect fabric wear

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Authors

Mary Ann Morris, University of California
Harriet H. Prato, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(1):18-19.

Published January 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: As much as half of the wear on fabrics during use may occur in laundering. Consequently, it is important to control the laundry process so that good appearance and adequate soil removal are balanced with minimum abrasive damage. Abrasion may occur both in washing and in drying, and studies have shown that water quality, detergent type, and drying conditions are important variables affecting the amount of damage. Figure 1 shows varying amounts of abrasion that can occur along a fabric crease after repeated Iaunderings.

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Author notes

This investigation was supported in part by a USDA contract.

Laundering methods affect fabric wear

Mary Ann Morris, Harriet H. Prato
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Laundering methods affect fabric wear

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Mary Ann Morris, University of California
Harriet H. Prato, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(1):18-19.

Published January 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: As much as half of the wear on fabrics during use may occur in laundering. Consequently, it is important to control the laundry process so that good appearance and adequate soil removal are balanced with minimum abrasive damage. Abrasion may occur both in washing and in drying, and studies have shown that water quality, detergent type, and drying conditions are important variables affecting the amount of damage. Figure 1 shows varying amounts of abrasion that can occur along a fabric crease after repeated Iaunderings.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This investigation was supported in part by a USDA contract.


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