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Measuring nitrogen loss from denitrification

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Authors

Dennis E. Rolston , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(1):12-13.

Published January 01, 1977

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Denitrification is the biological reduction of nitrate and nitrite to volatile gases, usually nitrous oxide or molecular nitrogen, or both. Denitrification is accomplished by bacteria capable of using nitrate in place of oxygen. Under aerobic conditions the bacteria oxidize carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and water. In the absence of oxygen these bacteria oxidize carbohydrates in nitrate respiration, yielding carbon dioxide, water, and the volatile gases, nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen.

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Measuring nitrogen loss from denitrification

Dennis E. Rolston
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Measuring nitrogen loss from denitrification

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Dennis E. Rolston , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 31(1):12-13.

Published January 01, 1977

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Denitrification is the biological reduction of nitrate and nitrite to volatile gases, usually nitrous oxide or molecular nitrogen, or both. Denitrification is accomplished by bacteria capable of using nitrate in place of oxygen. Under aerobic conditions the bacteria oxidize carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and water. In the absence of oxygen these bacteria oxidize carbohydrates in nitrate respiration, yielding carbon dioxide, water, and the volatile gases, nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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