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California Agriculture
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Drip application of nitrogen is efficient

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Authors

Robert J. Miller, U.C.
Dennis E. Rolston, U.C.
Roy S. Rauschkolb, U.C.
David W. Wolfe, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(11):16-18.

Published November 01, 1976

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Fertilizer uptake by irrigated plants is influenced considerably by fertilizer placement and timing and by water application methods. Because some fertilizer elements move with water in the soil, these plant nutrients must remain or arrive within the sphere of the plant roots after fertilizer and water are applied. The goal is to develop cultural practices by which crop nutrient needs are satisfied by maximum uptake from a minimum quantity of applied fertilizer.

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Drip application of nitrogen is efficient

Robert J. Miller, Dennis E. Rolston, Roy S. Rauschkolb, David W. Wolfe
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Drip application of nitrogen is efficient

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Robert J. Miller, U.C.
Dennis E. Rolston, U.C.
Roy S. Rauschkolb, U.C.
David W. Wolfe, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(11):16-18.

Published November 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Fertilizer uptake by irrigated plants is influenced considerably by fertilizer placement and timing and by water application methods. Because some fertilizer elements move with water in the soil, these plant nutrients must remain or arrive within the sphere of the plant roots after fertilizer and water are applied. The goal is to develop cultural practices by which crop nutrient needs are satisfied by maximum uptake from a minimum quantity of applied fertilizer.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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