California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Energy, public opinion, and public policy—a survey of urban, suburban, and rural communities

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Authors

Edward J. Blakely, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(8):4-5.

Published August 01, 1976

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: The California lifestyle depends on easy access to in-expensive energy. Continued rising energy costs probably will mean drastic alterations in that lifestyle and consequently in the growth patterns of the state's communities. It seems apparent, furthermore, that public attitudes about the energy crisis - its causes and consequences — will influence state and national policy.

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Author notes

A new type of module transport unit that became commercially available in 1975 picks up and hauls cotton modules made directly on the ground, thereby eliminating the need for pallets. Total loading time in the field avenged about 8 minutes less for a palletless module than for a pallet module. The palletless system eliminates the problems associated with handling, storing, and repairing pallets, and requires a much lower total equipment investment than the pallet system. But without pallets, the bottom cotton is more likely to get wet from min or moist soil. When the oneway hauling distance is not over 10 miles and the annual use per mover is greater than 400 modules, total field-to-suction costs are substantially less with the palletless system than with the pallet system. For less than 300 modules per year per mover, the pallet system is more economical.

Energy, public opinion, and public policy—a survey of urban, suburban, and rural communities

Edward J. Blakely
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Energy, public opinion, and public policy—a survey of urban, suburban, and rural communities

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Edward J. Blakely, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(8):4-5.

Published August 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: The California lifestyle depends on easy access to in-expensive energy. Continued rising energy costs probably will mean drastic alterations in that lifestyle and consequently in the growth patterns of the state's communities. It seems apparent, furthermore, that public attitudes about the energy crisis - its causes and consequences — will influence state and national policy.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

A new type of module transport unit that became commercially available in 1975 picks up and hauls cotton modules made directly on the ground, thereby eliminating the need for pallets. Total loading time in the field avenged about 8 minutes less for a palletless module than for a pallet module. The palletless system eliminates the problems associated with handling, storing, and repairing pallets, and requires a much lower total equipment investment than the pallet system. But without pallets, the bottom cotton is more likely to get wet from min or moist soil. When the oneway hauling distance is not over 10 miles and the annual use per mover is greater than 400 modules, total field-to-suction costs are substantially less with the palletless system than with the pallet system. For less than 300 modules per year per mover, the pallet system is more economical.


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