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Phalaris “staggers” in California

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Authors

V. V. Rendig, U.C.
D. W. Cooper
J. R. Dunbar, U.C.
C. M. Lawrence
W. J. Clawson, U.C.
R. B. Bushnell, U.C.
E. A. McComb, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(6):8-10.

Published June 01, 1976

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Stock grazing on pastures in which Phalaris species are the predominant grass have on occasion developed what appears to be a neurological disorder which results in the “staggers,” a term used to describe their unsteady, stumbling gait. Other manifestations include restlessness, hyperexcitability, twitching of the ears, head bobbing, jaw tremors, heavy breathing, and an excessively high pulse rate. When driven, the animals are often unable to unflex their forelimbs and they collapse. The pathological features associated with the disorder have not been well defined, although some degeneration of tracts in the spinal cord and haemosiderosis of the kidney have often been observed. Heavy losses of animals have occurred.

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Author notes

Excellent technical assistance was provided by Peggy Adams and Mary Miller. The assistance of Joh Mitchell, Don Torell, and the Humboldt County Wool Growers in conducting the field studies and of J. E. Street in obtaining seed for the greenhouse studies is gratefully acknow ledged. The study was partially funded by grants from the U. S. Public Health Service and the Kearney Foundation.

Phalaris “staggers” in California

V. V. Rendig, D. W. Cooper, J. R. Dunbar, C. M. Lawrence, W. J. Clawson, R. B. Bushnell, E. A. McComb
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Phalaris “staggers” in California

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

V. V. Rendig, U.C.
D. W. Cooper
J. R. Dunbar, U.C.
C. M. Lawrence
W. J. Clawson, U.C.
R. B. Bushnell, U.C.
E. A. McComb, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(6):8-10.

Published June 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Stock grazing on pastures in which Phalaris species are the predominant grass have on occasion developed what appears to be a neurological disorder which results in the “staggers,” a term used to describe their unsteady, stumbling gait. Other manifestations include restlessness, hyperexcitability, twitching of the ears, head bobbing, jaw tremors, heavy breathing, and an excessively high pulse rate. When driven, the animals are often unable to unflex their forelimbs and they collapse. The pathological features associated with the disorder have not been well defined, although some degeneration of tracts in the spinal cord and haemosiderosis of the kidney have often been observed. Heavy losses of animals have occurred.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Excellent technical assistance was provided by Peggy Adams and Mary Miller. The assistance of Joh Mitchell, Don Torell, and the Humboldt County Wool Growers in conducting the field studies and of J. E. Street in obtaining seed for the greenhouse studies is gratefully acknow ledged. The study was partially funded by grants from the U. S. Public Health Service and the Kearney Foundation.


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