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Computer model aids in weevil control

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Authors

A. P. Gutierrez, University of California
U. Regev, University of California
C. G. Summers, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(4):8-9.

Published April 01, 1976

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: During the late 1950's, the Egyptian alfalfa weevil invaded alfalfa in the desert regions of the southwestern United States. In 1974, it caused in excess of 18 million dollars in damage (1974 California Department of Food and Agriculture Report). This is not surprising as, under certain circumstances, this pest can completely defoliate a crop. In addition, the routine pesticide applications which have been directed against this pest appear to have induced secondary pest outbreaks of other formerly innocuous pests (e.g., aphids, mites and various Lepidoptera), which also, require further pesticide applications to control them. The problems of increasing pesticide applications and the associated costs are so severe that they jeopardize the economical cultivation of alfalfa in the central valley of California.

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Computer model aids in weevil control

A. P. Gutierrez, U. Regev, C. G. Summers
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Computer model aids in weevil control

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

A. P. Gutierrez, University of California
U. Regev, University of California
C. G. Summers, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(4):8-9.

Published April 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: During the late 1950's, the Egyptian alfalfa weevil invaded alfalfa in the desert regions of the southwestern United States. In 1974, it caused in excess of 18 million dollars in damage (1974 California Department of Food and Agriculture Report). This is not surprising as, under certain circumstances, this pest can completely defoliate a crop. In addition, the routine pesticide applications which have been directed against this pest appear to have induced secondary pest outbreaks of other formerly innocuous pests (e.g., aphids, mites and various Lepidoptera), which also, require further pesticide applications to control them. The problems of increasing pesticide applications and the associated costs are so severe that they jeopardize the economical cultivation of alfalfa in the central valley of California.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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