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Control of hillside seepage in avocado and citrus orchards

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Authors

R. M. Burns
B. W. Lee
F. K. Aljibury
J. L. Meyer

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(4):20-21.

Published April 01, 1976

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Many of the citrus and avocado orchards near the foothills of Ventura and Orange counties are damaged by root disease and excessive wetness from hillside seepage. The damage is most severe during wet years or when the adjacent hills are excessively irrigated (see fig. 1). Dense subsoil and steep topographical conditions cause excess water from rain or irrigation to seep underground downslope creating a drainage problem (see fig. 2).

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Control of hillside seepage in avocado and citrus orchards

R. M. Burns, B. W. Lee, F. K. Aljibury, J. L. Meyer
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Control of hillside seepage in avocado and citrus orchards

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

R. M. Burns
B. W. Lee
F. K. Aljibury
J. L. Meyer

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(4):20-21.

Published April 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: Many of the citrus and avocado orchards near the foothills of Ventura and Orange counties are damaged by root disease and excessive wetness from hillside seepage. The damage is most severe during wet years or when the adjacent hills are excessively irrigated (see fig. 1). Dense subsoil and steep topographical conditions cause excess water from rain or irrigation to seep underground downslope creating a drainage problem (see fig. 2).

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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