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Drip and furrow irrigation of fresh market tomatoes on a slowly permeable soil: Part 1. production

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Authors

V. H. Schweers, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center
D. W. Grimes, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(2):8-10.

Published February 01, 1976

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Abstract

Growers of fresh market tomatoes frequently attribute an increase in small fruit during the growing season to poor water relations. In studies on a Vista sandy loam soil, greater numbers of small fruit were produced by drought-stressed plants. A high frequency of furrow irrigation caused the soil surface to "seal" greatly restricting water penetration and lowering the production of large tomatoes. Production was best when water was added through a drip hose placed at the base of plants in the row or by less frequent furrow irrigation.

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Drip and furrow irrigation of fresh market tomatoes on a slowly permeable soil: Part 1. production

V. H. Schweers, D. W. Grimes
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Drip and furrow irrigation of fresh market tomatoes on a slowly permeable soil: Part 1. production

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

V. H. Schweers, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center
D. W. Grimes, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(2):8-10.

Published February 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Growers of fresh market tomatoes frequently attribute an increase in small fruit during the growing season to poor water relations. In studies on a Vista sandy loam soil, greater numbers of small fruit were produced by drought-stressed plants. A high frequency of furrow irrigation caused the soil surface to "seal" greatly restricting water penetration and lowering the production of large tomatoes. Production was best when water was added through a drip hose placed at the base of plants in the row or by less frequent furrow irrigation.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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