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California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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Control of biting and annoying gnats with fertilizer

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Authors

E.F. Legner, University of California
R.D. Sjogren, University of Arizona
G.S. Olton, University of Arizona
L. Moore

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(2):14-17.

Published February 01, 1976

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Abstract

Naturally breeding field populations of Hippelates eye gnats and Leptoconops biting gnats were reduced with granular and spray applications of urea to the soil. Control ranged from 10 to 96 percent depending on the dosage and application method (disced or surface-applied). Possible modes of action are mechanical abrasion of gnat larvae, and the favoring of fungal infections. The use of urea as a substance harmless to natural enemies may be beneficial in the integrated control of pestiferous soil arthropods.

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Control of biting and annoying gnats with fertilizer

E.F. Legner, R.D. Sjogren, G.S. Olton, L. Moore
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Control of biting and annoying gnats with fertilizer

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

E.F. Legner, University of California
R.D. Sjogren, University of Arizona
G.S. Olton, University of Arizona
L. Moore

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(2):14-17.

Published February 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Naturally breeding field populations of Hippelates eye gnats and Leptoconops biting gnats were reduced with granular and spray applications of urea to the soil. Control ranged from 10 to 96 percent depending on the dosage and application method (disced or surface-applied). Possible modes of action are mechanical abrasion of gnat larvae, and the favoring of fungal infections. The use of urea as a substance harmless to natural enemies may be beneficial in the integrated control of pestiferous soil arthropods.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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