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Soil fumigation: One way to cleanse nematode-infested vineyard lands

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Authors

D. J. Raski, University of California
N. O. Jones, University of California
J. J. Kissler
D. A. Luvisi, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(1):4-7.

Published January 01, 1976

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Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: In recent years there have been some exciting successes using deep-placement, high-dosage soil fumigation to produce flourishing grapevines where previous crops have failed due to nematodes. Replanting new grapevines on their own roots in nematode infested soils can be disastrous because nematode attacks may destroy the developing root systems, restrict plant vigor, and reduce potential yields. In extreme cases young vines are stunted by nematodes and never develop sufficient vigor to produce a full crop.

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Soil fumigation: One way to cleanse nematode-infested vineyard lands

D. J. Raski, N. O. Jones, J. J. Kissler, D. A. Luvisi
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Soil fumigation: One way to cleanse nematode-infested vineyard lands

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

D. J. Raski, University of California
N. O. Jones, University of California
J. J. Kissler
D. A. Luvisi, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 30(1):4-7.

Published January 01, 1976

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Not available – first paragraph follows: In recent years there have been some exciting successes using deep-placement, high-dosage soil fumigation to produce flourishing grapevines where previous crops have failed due to nematodes. Replanting new grapevines on their own roots in nematode infested soils can be disastrous because nematode attacks may destroy the developing root systems, restrict plant vigor, and reduce potential yields. In extreme cases young vines are stunted by nematodes and never develop sufficient vigor to produce a full crop.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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