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U.C. signal barley

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Authors

G. F. Worker, El Centro
C. W. E. Schaller, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 29(9):13-13.

Published September 01, 1975

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: UC Signal barley, developed at the Imperial Valley Field Station, El Centro, within 40 miles of Mount Signal for which it was named, is well-adapted to the lower desert areas of California. In comparative tests over a 3- to 7-year period, it has shown an 8 to 30 percent yield superiority over varieties previously recommended for the Imperial Valley.

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Author notes

Cooperating in the study were J. D. Prato and W. H. Isom of Cooperative Extension at UC Davis and Riverside, respectively, and Farm Advisors G. J. St. Andre, Fresno County, and S. W. Kite, Kings County.

U.C. signal barley

G. F. Worker, C. W. E. Schaller
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

U.C. signal barley

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

G. F. Worker, El Centro
C. W. E. Schaller, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 29(9):13-13.

Published September 01, 1975

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: UC Signal barley, developed at the Imperial Valley Field Station, El Centro, within 40 miles of Mount Signal for which it was named, is well-adapted to the lower desert areas of California. In comparative tests over a 3- to 7-year period, it has shown an 8 to 30 percent yield superiority over varieties previously recommended for the Imperial Valley.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Cooperating in the study were J. D. Prato and W. H. Isom of Cooperative Extension at UC Davis and Riverside, respectively, and Farm Advisors G. J. St. Andre, Fresno County, and S. W. Kite, Kings County.


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