California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
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California Agriculture

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Differential susceptibility of brown garden snail to metaldehyde

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Authors

T. W. Fisher, University of California
R. E. Orth, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 29(6):7-8.

Published June 01, 1975

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In southern california, Helix aspersa (Müller), or brown garden snail (BGS), is the most obvious introduced land mollusk. Outdoors, as opposed to a glasshouse environment, BGS occupies the same general habitat as several species of introduced slugs. Native land mollusks seldom invade cultivated areas, preferring undisturbed natural habitats.

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Author notes

John D. Hollen-steiner, Landscape Specialist, State of California Department of Transportation, District 8, and Wendell R. Young, Super vising Biologist, Sun Bernardino County, Department of Agriculture, provided assistance.

Differential susceptibility of brown garden snail to metaldehyde

T. W. Fisher, R. E. Orth
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Differential susceptibility of brown garden snail to metaldehyde

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

T. W. Fisher, University of California
R. E. Orth, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 29(6):7-8.

Published June 01, 1975

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: In southern california, Helix aspersa (Müller), or brown garden snail (BGS), is the most obvious introduced land mollusk. Outdoors, as opposed to a glasshouse environment, BGS occupies the same general habitat as several species of introduced slugs. Native land mollusks seldom invade cultivated areas, preferring undisturbed natural habitats.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

John D. Hollen-steiner, Landscape Specialist, State of California Department of Transportation, District 8, and Wendell R. Young, Super vising Biologist, Sun Bernardino County, Department of Agriculture, provided assistance.


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