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Effect of soil moisture on the size of plums

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Authors

F. J. Veihmeyer, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 29(1):12-13.

Published January 01, 1975

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests were made to determine the effect of different amounts of readily available soil moisture on the growth of plums in California's dry San Joaquin Valley. In the first and second years, when there was practically no available soil moisture in the 6- to 12-ft depth, the dry-treatment plums were not significantly smaller in diameter than the wettreatment ones. But when the soil moisture was exhausted to a depth of 12 ft, the dry treatment plums were significantly smaller. The combination of Japanese plums on apricot rootstock evidently produces a deep-rooted tree, with moisture below the 6-ft depth constituting an important source of supply.

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Author notes

The studies reported here were done in cooperation with Dr. A. H. Hendrickson, who died before this manuscript was written.

Effect of soil moisture on the size of plums

F. J. Veihmeyer
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Effect of soil moisture on the size of plums

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

F. J. Veihmeyer, Davis

Publication Information

California Agriculture 29(1):12-13.

Published January 01, 1975

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Tests were made to determine the effect of different amounts of readily available soil moisture on the growth of plums in California's dry San Joaquin Valley. In the first and second years, when there was practically no available soil moisture in the 6- to 12-ft depth, the dry-treatment plums were not significantly smaller in diameter than the wettreatment ones. But when the soil moisture was exhausted to a depth of 12 ft, the dry treatment plums were significantly smaller. The combination of Japanese plums on apricot rootstock evidently produces a deep-rooted tree, with moisture below the 6-ft depth constituting an important source of supply.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

The studies reported here were done in cooperation with Dr. A. H. Hendrickson, who died before this manuscript was written.


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