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Instant assessment techniques for crop performance

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Authors

Norman Terry , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(12):6-8.

Published December 01, 1974

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Abstract

Recent developments in plant physiology suggest possible new techniques for rapidly determining how well a crop is growing at various times in the season. Measurements of physiological activities of growing plants such as photosynthetic CO2 uptake by leaves might be used to detect whether a crop was growing below its maximum potential rate, enabling the farmer to correct an agronomically controllable problem before crop losses were incurred. This report discusses the feasibility of such an approach and presents experimental data on the effects of deficiencies of phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and manganese on various physiological attributes of sugar beets.

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Instant assessment techniques for crop performance

Norman Terry
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Instant assessment techniques for crop performance

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Norman Terry , University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(12):6-8.

Published December 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Recent developments in plant physiology suggest possible new techniques for rapidly determining how well a crop is growing at various times in the season. Measurements of physiological activities of growing plants such as photosynthetic CO2 uptake by leaves might be used to detect whether a crop was growing below its maximum potential rate, enabling the farmer to correct an agronomically controllable problem before crop losses were incurred. This report discusses the feasibility of such an approach and presents experimental data on the effects of deficiencies of phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and manganese on various physiological attributes of sugar beets.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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