California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

World marketing of feed grains management

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. H. Cothern, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(12):10-11.

Published December 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING IS a complex subject, conditioned as it is by political and social factors as well as economic criteria. Present policymakers are attempting to balance international nonagricultural economic goals with domestic food needs, at the same time that cereal inventories are at low levels. This situation suggests the need for contingency planning, with a thorough evaluation of the risks in the management alternatives available in the U.S. and other countries. Each strategy has advantages and limitations in terms of administrative capability, flexibility, and cost.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

World marketing of feed grains management

J. H. Cothern
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

World marketing of feed grains management

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. H. Cothern, University of California

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(12):10-11.

Published December 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Author Affiliations show

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING IS a complex subject, conditioned as it is by political and social factors as well as economic criteria. Present policymakers are attempting to balance international nonagricultural economic goals with domestic food needs, at the same time that cereal inventories are at low levels. This situation suggests the need for contingency planning, with a thorough evaluation of the risks in the management alternatives available in the U.S. and other countries. Each strategy has advantages and limitations in terms of administrative capability, flexibility, and cost.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu