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Pollen longevity in pistacia

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Authors

J. C. Crane, University of California
H. I. Fori, U.C.
C. Daniel, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(11):8-9.

Published November 01, 1974

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE COMMERCIAL PISTACHIO nut tree (Pistacia vera L.), like all species of Pistacia, produces male and female flowers on separate trees. Male trees are strategically located among females in the orchard to provide pollen at the time the female flowers are receptive. Although the bloom period of the ‘Peters’ cultivar (male) generally overlaps that of ‘Kerman’ (currently the only female cultivar being planted commercially), in some years all the pollen is shed before the last of the ‘Kerman’ flowers is pollinated.

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Pollen longevity in pistacia

J. C. Crane, H. I. Fori, C. Daniel
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Pollen longevity in pistacia

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. C. Crane, University of California
H. I. Fori, U.C.
C. Daniel, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(11):8-9.

Published November 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: THE COMMERCIAL PISTACHIO nut tree (Pistacia vera L.), like all species of Pistacia, produces male and female flowers on separate trees. Male trees are strategically located among females in the orchard to provide pollen at the time the female flowers are receptive. Although the bloom period of the ‘Peters’ cultivar (male) generally overlaps that of ‘Kerman’ (currently the only female cultivar being planted commercially), in some years all the pollen is shed before the last of the ‘Kerman’ flowers is pollinated.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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