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Energy and Agriculture economic perspectives

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Authors

J. G. Youde
H. O. Carter

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(10):4-5.

Published October 01, 1974

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although increased costs resulting from higher prices for energy-related needs on the farm appear to be the most obvious problem, world marketing complications resulting from the “energy crisis”—not production costs-will also create problems for U. S. agriculture in the next several years.

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Author notes

This article was excerpted (by Mary Bowen Hall) from a paper by Carter and Youdr, “Some Impacts of the Changing Energy Situation on U. S. Agriculture,” presented in August, 1974, at the Annual Meeting of the American Agricultural Economics Association; and from a paper by Youde, Hoy F. Carman, and George J. Hellyer, “Energy and Western Agricultural Trade,” presented in Jdy, 1974, at the Annual Meeting of the Western Agricultural Economics Association. Copies of both papers are available from the Department of Agricultural Economics, U.C. Davis.

Energy and Agriculture economic perspectives

J. G. Youde, H. O. Carter
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Energy and Agriculture economic perspectives

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

J. G. Youde
H. O. Carter

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(10):4-5.

Published October 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: Although increased costs resulting from higher prices for energy-related needs on the farm appear to be the most obvious problem, world marketing complications resulting from the “energy crisis”—not production costs-will also create problems for U. S. agriculture in the next several years.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

This article was excerpted (by Mary Bowen Hall) from a paper by Carter and Youdr, “Some Impacts of the Changing Energy Situation on U. S. Agriculture,” presented in August, 1974, at the Annual Meeting of the American Agricultural Economics Association; and from a paper by Youde, Hoy F. Carman, and George J. Hellyer, “Energy and Western Agricultural Trade,” presented in Jdy, 1974, at the Annual Meeting of the Western Agricultural Economics Association. Copies of both papers are available from the Department of Agricultural Economics, U.C. Davis.


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