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Onion varieties, honeybee visitations, and seed yield

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Authors

Elmer C. Carlson

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(9):16-18.

Published September 01, 1974

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Abstract

Onion seed plants, Allium cepa L., exhibited varietal differences regarding honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) visitation; incidence of pink root disease, Pyrenochaeta terrestris Hansen) Gorenz, Walker, and Larson; numbers of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) present; and seed yields. Results from an isolated onion planting showed that the male sterile, Code 2 hybrid, adjacent to a pollen-parent, was significantly more attractive to honeybees and produced significantly more seed than a second comparable hybrid.

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Author notes

Assisting this study were John Campbell, Nurseryman at Davis, and James Harrington and Jasper Laraway, Department of Vegetable Crops, U.C., Davis. Onion weds and bulbs were obtained from Ferry Morse and Asgro Seed Companies.

Onion varieties, honeybee visitations, and seed yield

Elmer C. Carlson
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Onion varieties, honeybee visitations, and seed yield

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

Elmer C. Carlson

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(9):16-18.

Published September 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Onion seed plants, Allium cepa L., exhibited varietal differences regarding honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) visitation; incidence of pink root disease, Pyrenochaeta terrestris Hansen) Gorenz, Walker, and Larson; numbers of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) present; and seed yields. Results from an isolated onion planting showed that the male sterile, Code 2 hybrid, adjacent to a pollen-parent, was significantly more attractive to honeybees and produced significantly more seed than a second comparable hybrid.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Author notes

Assisting this study were John Campbell, Nurseryman at Davis, and James Harrington and Jasper Laraway, Department of Vegetable Crops, U.C., Davis. Onion weds and bulbs were obtained from Ferry Morse and Asgro Seed Companies.


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