California Agriculture
California Agriculture
California Agriculture
University of California
California Agriculture

Archive

Survival of selected desert shrubs under dry soil conditions

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

S. B. Clark, U.C.
J. Letey, U.C.
O. R. Lunt, U.C.
A. Wallace, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(8):14-15.

Published August 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Four desert plants species were grown in plexiglass cylinders in which thermocouple psychrometers were placed so that soil moisture potential could be measured. After establishment the plants were allowed to extract the soil moisture to −60 bars. Different samples of each were then irrigated at different time intervals to measure recovery characteristics. Partial wilting of each occurred at much lower soil moisture potentials than agricultural crops and each recovered in varying degrees for irrigation 8 to 10 days after reaching the point of −60 bars soil moisture potential. These studies of drought resistant species help understand some responses of other plants to soil moisture variations.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

Survival of selected desert shrubs under dry soil conditions

S. B. Clark, J. Letey, O. R. Lunt, A. Wallace
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Survival of selected desert shrubs under dry soil conditions

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

S. B. Clark, U.C.
J. Letey, U.C.
O. R. Lunt, U.C.
A. Wallace, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(8):14-15.

Published August 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Four desert plants species were grown in plexiglass cylinders in which thermocouple psychrometers were placed so that soil moisture potential could be measured. After establishment the plants were allowed to extract the soil moisture to −60 bars. Different samples of each were then irrigated at different time intervals to measure recovery characteristics. Partial wilting of each occurred at much lower soil moisture potentials than agricultural crops and each recovered in varying degrees for irrigation 8 to 10 days after reaching the point of −60 bars soil moisture potential. These studies of drought resistant species help understand some responses of other plants to soil moisture variations.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

University of California, 2801 Second Street, Room 184, Davis, CA, 95618
Email: calag@ucanr.edu | Phone: (530) 750-1223 | Fax: (510) 665-3427
Website: http://calag.ucanr.edu