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California Agriculture
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Estimating costs of quality changes in using waste water for irrigation

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Authors

D. C. Baier, U.C.
W. W. Wood, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(7):9-10.

Published July 01, 1974

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: AMONG CURRENT ISSUES in water management, perhaps none is more critical than evaluating the use of waste water in irrigation. Waste water includes return flow irrigation water, treated municipal effluent, and low quality waste water from other miscellaneous sources. Opinions range from those which view such use as completely impracticable to those which view reclaimed water as superior to present water supplies. At issue is the possible cost penalty from increased salts and nutrients in reclaimed water used to replace present water.

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Estimating costs of quality changes in using waste water for irrigation

D. C. Baier, W. W. Wood
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Estimating costs of quality changes in using waste water for irrigation

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

D. C. Baier, U.C.
W. W. Wood, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(7):9-10.

Published July 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: AMONG CURRENT ISSUES in water management, perhaps none is more critical than evaluating the use of waste water in irrigation. Waste water includes return flow irrigation water, treated municipal effluent, and low quality waste water from other miscellaneous sources. Opinions range from those which view such use as completely impracticable to those which view reclaimed water as superior to present water supplies. At issue is the possible cost penalty from increased salts and nutrients in reclaimed water used to replace present water.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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