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Fungus and enzyme activity in fresh apricots as related to softening of canned fruits

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Authors

N. F. Sommer, U.C.
J. R. Buchanan, U.C.
R. J. Fortlage, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(7):8-8.

Published July 01, 1974

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Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: CANNED APRICOTS in Australia are believed to be softened by heat-tolerant pectolytic enzymes from the black bread mold, Rhizopus stolonifer (Ehrenb. ex Fr.) Lind. Australian workers have duplicated softening problems by adding a Rhizopus-rotted fruit or juice from a rot lesion to cans. Fungi were killed by heat-processing at 100°C (212°F) for 10 minutes but a portion of their pectolytic enzyme activity remained. The Australian work has now been duplicated independently in two California studies.

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Fungus and enzyme activity in fresh apricots as related to softening of canned fruits

N. F. Sommer, J. R. Buchanan, R. J. Fortlage
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu

Fungus and enzyme activity in fresh apricots as related to softening of canned fruits

Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article
Share using any of the popular social networks Share by sending an email Print article

Authors

N. F. Sommer, U.C.
J. R. Buchanan, U.C.
R. J. Fortlage, U.C.

Publication Information

California Agriculture 28(7):8-8.

Published July 01, 1974

PDF  |  Citation  |  Permissions

Abstract

Abstract Not Available – First paragraph follows: CANNED APRICOTS in Australia are believed to be softened by heat-tolerant pectolytic enzymes from the black bread mold, Rhizopus stolonifer (Ehrenb. ex Fr.) Lind. Australian workers have duplicated softening problems by adding a Rhizopus-rotted fruit or juice from a rot lesion to cans. Fungi were killed by heat-processing at 100°C (212°F) for 10 minutes but a portion of their pectolytic enzyme activity remained. The Australian work has now been duplicated independently in two California studies.

Full text

Full text is available in PDF.

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